Breaking the Chains of Analysis Paralysis – The Paradox of Choice (Part 2 of 7)

Breaking the Chains of Analysis Paralysis – The Paradox of Choice (Part 2 of 7)

This is the second article in a series of 7 that I will be putting up to highlight primary causes of AP among people who play games, and discuss strategies that you can apply as a designer to reduce the potential for AP if it is a problem. Each article in this series will go into depth on one potential cause of AP, examples of situations where it can be problematic, and present some solutions that can improve the situation

This article discusses The Paradox of Choice, the problem of too many options.

Read More

Breaking the Chains of Analysis Paralysis – The Black Box (Part 1 of 7)

Breaking the Chains of Analysis Paralysis – The Black Box (Part 1 of 7)

This is the first article in a series of 7 that I will be putting up to highlight primary causes of AP among people who play games, and discuss strategies that you can apply as a designer to reduce the potential for AP if it is a problem. Each article in this series will go into depth on one potential cause of AP, examples of situations where it can be problematic, and present some solutions that can improve the situation

This article discusses The Black Box, the problem of information obscurity.

Read More

Playtesting with Purpose

Playtesting with Purpose

A core tenant of game development is playtesting. You must playtest a lot in order to refine ideas, improve the flow of play, gain insight and new perspectives, and to simply make sure what you have is fun. This article is about best practices when playtesting, taking notes, identifying problems, developing solutions, and tracking this information in a way that saves time and improves your playtesting efficiency.

Read More

Ruling the Roost

Ruling the Roost

This post is about boardgame rulebooks. The following represents my opinions on the subject – the elements I consider to be necessary for a rulebook to be good, and the things that I consider to be mistakes that are commonly made in writing them. This article describes the process that I use when creating rulebooks for my own games, and my reasons for doing so. Although I cite specific examples of design elements that I agree and disagree with, I do not do so to disparage any other’s work. You may not agree with my opinions, but I welcome comments, other examples, and suggestions for improvements.

Read More